Author Archive

Interview: Eleanor Aldrich

By |

The Painter as Experimental Chemist   The second time I hung one of Eleanor Aldrich’s paintings in an exhibit, I was apprehensive. Untitled (After Venus) was a 24” x 21” floppy piece of silicone with embedded paint. It had been molded on a piece of bubble wrap, and had the transparent look of an unflavored…

Read more »

Notes on Neo-regionalism and Mark Holmes

By |

“The flatness, event-less-ness, and openness of the surrounding landscape opens a space to go deep.” MH   I’m drawn to art that advocates for the rural – formally and conceptually rigorous work that connects critical texts to geography and categories of communities. In inland America, particularly outside the metroplex, the most memorable projects are contemplative…

Read more »

A Painter’s Refusal

By |

In Melville’s short story “Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street” Bartleby, a young, introverted young man, is hired by an attorney to copy law forms. Told from the lawyers perspective it is the story of how Bartleby disrupts the workflow with his odd, peculiar refusal to follow orders, using the phrase: “I would…

Read more »

Mural Spotting in North Texas

By |

By Nicole Foran   During our bi-annual family visit to the DFW area to show off our recent weight gains and my son’s increasing vocabulary of profane words, my mother in law insisted on giving us a tour of all the recent murals that had been popping up around Denton, Texas. This entailed strapping my…

Read more »

Interview With Delita Martin

By |

By Jesse Butcher   Delita Martin is an artist currently based in Huffman, Texas. She received a BFA in drawing from Texas Southern University and a MFA in printmaking from Purdue University. Formally a member of the fine arts faculty at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Martin is currently works as a full-time…

Read more »

Art is Long and Time is Short: At the Intersection of Art and Community

By |

No.88 By Jared Butler   To lift a weight so heavy, Would take your courage, Sisyphus! Although one’s heart is in the work, Art is long and Time is short. Charles Baudelaire, “Le Guignon” (Bad Luck, 1857) Arguably this summer’s most provocative arts-related story in Georgia, the breakdown of the Macon Arts Alliance’s (MAA) Mill…

Read more »

Interview with Patricia Lee Daigle, Director of the Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art

By |

By Jesse Butcher   How did you become a curator/gallery Director? I’ve loved art and museums since I was a child, but it wasn’t until I was in graduate school that I wandered into the curatorial world. Maybe it was the recession or just a desire for change, but I felt this urgent need to…

Read more »

Living in an Imagined Future: Queering the Southern Artistic Narrative, A Call to Arms

By |

No.88 By Liz Clayton Scofield The Southern queer narrative is often one of migration. Get out when you can. Go to California, New York, Portland. (I did actually go to Portland. It was short lived.) Artists often echo this narrative.  To be a Southern queer artist, to be Elsewhere, to be living in an Imagined…

Read more »

Michi Meko: Navigating Contemporary Art

By |

No.88 By Sara Lee Burd Atlanta-based artist Michi Meko remembers the fear he experienced when he learned that being black meant following certain rules to make other people comfortable. “When you are a black teenage boy there is a moment where your elder will tell you how to survive your daily life. This is how…

Read more »

Barry Doupe: Ponytail

By |

Suspending the Story to Tell the Story Review By Matt Christy Ponytail is the moment laughter turns into tortured dry heaving. Ponytail is the Toa Te Ching mixed with vodka and spritzer. Ponytail is an oversized baby that babbles in animal calls and Zen koans. Ponytail is airport boredom. Flounder flavored toothpaste. Acupuncture tit. Burst…

Read more »