Archive For The “Features” Category

Glitter in the Makerspace, Trouble in the Water:

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Glitter in the Makerspace, Trouble in the Water:

Appalachian Futurism & Southern Constellations – Elsewhere, North Carolina By Ash Smith   Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. — Arthur C. Clarke     This summer, before arriving at my artist residency at Elsewhere Museum, I was traveling to my childhood home in the mountains of western North Carolina when my dad…

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Life through the lens of Randy Hayes

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Life through the lens of Randy Hayes

By Jacqueline Knirnschild     In 1948, a farm boy from Clinton, Mississippi stood on the Gulf Coast with his parents, stared out at the expanse of ocean and asked, “what is a ‘gulf’ and what is ‘Mexico’?”   “I couldn’t comprehend it,” artist Randy Hayes recalls. “Why were they pointing at this water? Then they…

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Perception in the Digital Age

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Perception in the Digital Age

Very Analog Experience of this Digital Intimacy   By Liz Scofield     Cloud puff thunder heart fire water flow electricity oceans puddles connect heartbeat chest tug body buzz lost breath chemical reaction eyes eyes eyes movement open a hand a palm a chest night to morning a sunrise a hug a goodbye that lingers…

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Notes on Neo-regionalism and Mark Holmes

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Notes on Neo-regionalism and Mark Holmes

“The flatness, event-less-ness, and openness of the surrounding landscape opens a space to go deep.” MH   I’m drawn to art that advocates for the rural – formally and conceptually rigorous work that connects critical texts to geography and categories of communities. In inland America, particularly outside the metroplex, the most memorable projects are contemplative…

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A Painter’s Refusal

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A Painter’s Refusal

In Melville’s short story “Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street” Bartleby, a young, introverted young man, is hired by an attorney to copy law forms. Told from the lawyers perspective it is the story of how Bartleby disrupts the workflow with his odd, peculiar refusal to follow orders, using the phrase: “I would…

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For the Wolfes, a Landscape of Family Memory

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For the Wolfes, a Landscape of Family Memory

By Sherry Lucas Periwinkles peek shyly from the green ground cover in early spring. Around back, unruly azaleas start to lose their fuchsia fire as delicate dogwoods dot the scene with white. At Wolfe Studio in Jackson, Mississippi, the shed roof’s bank of windows looks out on a pocket of untamed woods. Feasting eyes on…

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Mural Spotting in North Texas

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Mural Spotting in North Texas

By Nicole Foran   During our bi-annual family visit to the DFW area to show off our recent weight gains and my son’s increasing vocabulary of profane words, my mother in law insisted on giving us a tour of all the recent murals that had been popping up around Denton, Texas. This entailed strapping my…

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Art is Long and Time is Short: At the Intersection of Art and Community

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Art is Long and Time is Short: At the Intersection of Art and Community

No.88 By Jared Butler   To lift a weight so heavy, Would take your courage, Sisyphus! Although one’s heart is in the work, Art is long and Time is short. Charles Baudelaire, “Le Guignon” (Bad Luck, 1857) Arguably this summer’s most provocative arts-related story in Georgia, the breakdown of the Macon Arts Alliance’s (MAA) Mill…

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Living in an Imagined Future: Queering the Southern Artistic Narrative, A Call to Arms

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Living in an Imagined Future: Queering the Southern Artistic Narrative, A Call to Arms

No.88 By Liz Clayton Scofield The Southern queer narrative is often one of migration. Get out when you can. Go to California, New York, Portland. (I did actually go to Portland. It was short lived.) Artists often echo this narrative.  To be a Southern queer artist, to be Elsewhere, to be living in an Imagined…

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Michi Meko: Navigating Contemporary Art

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Michi Meko: Navigating Contemporary Art

No.88 By Sara Lee Burd Atlanta-based artist Michi Meko remembers the fear he experienced when he learned that being black meant following certain rules to make other people comfortable. “When you are a black teenage boy there is a moment where your elder will tell you how to survive your daily life. This is how…

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